Tag Archives: open access

Worth a Read: Open Access and the transformation of academic publishing

This short piece by Brad Weiss provides a reflection on Cultural Anthropology’s transition to open access publishing and a thoughtful discussion of the questions which drove this decision and the subsequent questions which exiting from Wiley-Blackwell has raised.

After the American Anthropological Association began publishing its journals through Wiley-Blackwell in 2004, critics from the Society for Cultural Anthropology wondered:

why should academics give the products of their scholarly labor—in the form of both their articles and their work as reviewers—to a for-profit press that generates its revenue by selling those products back to our home institutions in the form of (rather expensive) library subscriptions?

This question sparked the beginning of a journey towards open access. Read the rest of the story here:

Open access and the transformation of academic publishing: A view from Cultural Anthropology

David Novak “The Dubbing of a New Era: Audiocassettes, Open Access & the Dissonances of Digital Democracy”

Please join us for a talk by David Novak, Associate Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Barbara
Thursday, May 26, 2016 12-1:30pm, Social Science and Humanities, Room 1246
Lunch will be served. RSVP here
Novak_2016-05-26-a
David Novak is Associate Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Barbara, with affiliations in Anthropology, Film and Media Studies, and East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies. His work deals with the globalization of popular music, remediation, protest culture, and social practices of listening. He is the author of the award-winning Japanoise: Music at the Edge of Circulation (2013) and the co-editor of Keywords in Sound (2015), as well as recent essays and sound recordings in Public Culture, Cultural Anthropology, Popular Music, Sensory Studies, and The Wire. He is the founder of the Music and Sound Interest Group in the American Anthropological Association, and co-director of the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Music.

Co-Sponsored by:
Science and Technology Studies
Innovating Communication in Scholarship
The Center for Science and Innovation Studies

Notes from “Advancing Research Communication & Scholarship”

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I’m currently at the Advancing Research Communication & Scholarship conference. Hackathon, presentations on open data,  open access, and alt metrics. You can follow what’s happening via Twitter at #arcs2015. I’ll add some notes from the conference soon and am excited to present on “Beyond Open: Global Perspective on Research Communication and Knowledge Production.” The panel’s chaired by Brian Rosenblum (University of Kansas Libraries) and I am joining Jane Anderson (NYU) Mónica I. Feliú-Mójer, (Ciencia Puerto Rico and iBiology) and John Willinsky (Stanford). Below is the description:

Current scholarly communication initiatives are focused on expanding access, use, and reuse. This session will explore the relationship between these issues and the needs and goals of the developing world and marginalized communities.  We will consider how new models and expectations affect and address knowledge distribution structures in the developing world, and the control local research communities have over their own legacies and outputs.

Continue reading Notes from “Advancing Research Communication & Scholarship”

The Conversation on China’s embracing #openaccess for Science but not the Humanities

Well, this is very interesting and exactly the type of topic that fits in well with our ICIS project:

Humanities left behind as China embraces open access science.

The article reports on how China as a whole is pushing open access in the sciences but how the humanities in China are pretty much the opposite. The writer Michael Hockx suggests that a big revolution could happen if China embraced green open access in the humanities. Really interesting points here.

Interested in #OpenAccess publishing?: definitely take a look at this working paper from CREATe

Well, this is certainly the most comprehensive treatise I have ever seen on Open Access publishing: Open Access Publishing: A Literature Review | CREATe.  It was written by “Giancarlo Frosio under the supervision of Estelle Derclaye (2014)” and

comes from the Centre for Copyright and New Business Models in the Creative Economy (CREATe).  It is VERY comprehensive and has discussion, review, and comments on just about every issue associated with Open Access publishing that one could think of. I do not know if there is any particular “angle” to the writings here.  What I looked at (not all of the document) seemed to be a relatively objective assessment of various OA issues.  Anyway, it is definitely worth a look for anyone interested in scholarly publishing or Open Access publishing or related issues.

Wanted – low cost system for publishing an #OpenAccess journal

Well, I figure, if I am going to write blog posts about academic publishing, why not post them here, rather than at my “normal” blog.  One area of great interest to many in academic publishing is in how one can publish a new journal at low cost  – and yet have the journal be Open Access.  Although there is a lot of chatter about this topic, I figured I would use social media to get some additional ideas in this area.  So I posted a request to Twitter yesterday about this and have gotten a decent diversity of responses.  I have created a Storify summary of these responses. Any other ideas or suggestions would be welcome.