Tag Archives: Academic Publishing

Frontiers in Publishing: Experiences with Open Access Journals

Frontiers event poster 03-31-2016Thursday, March 31, 2016, 3pm to 6:00pm

Activities and Recreation Center (ARC), Meeting Room 1

RSVP here

Frontiers is a leading Open Access scholarly journal publisher, with 55 journals in many disciplines and growing. In addition to rising journal Impact Factors, Frontiers is advancing article-level and author metrics as new ways of measuring the impact of research. A growing number of UC Davis faculty members edit Frontiers journals and have gained experience with this new publishing model and its benefits and challenges for publishing research. Join us for a look at the benefits of Open Access publishing for improving research impact through increased citations, and a cross-disciplinary panel of five UC Davis editors, on how Frontiers has worked in practice.

Participants
MacKenzie Smith, University Library (moderator)
Neelima Roy Sinha, Plant Biology
Cecilia Giulivi, Molecular Biosciences & Vet Med
Patrice Koehl, Computer Science & Genome Center
Mary M Christopher, Vet Med Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology
Arne Ekstrom, Psychology
Sandra Hausmann, Frontiers

A presentation and panel will be followed by a networking reception from 5:00-6:00pm

Provoke! A Special Collection of Digital Sound Studies

Cross-posted on The Sound Ethnography Project

Screen-Shot-2015-01-06-at-12.05.12-PM-e1420564088283Provoke!  published its first online collection of digital sound studies, making scholarly communication just a little bit noisier. As the editors write:

“Provoke! creates a home for creative-critical projects by makers, documentary artists, and sound scholars whose work presses at the boundaries of scholarship. Envisioned as ‘provocations’ to existing forms of publication, these projects relate to one another through their deep engagement with sonic materials and innovative formal presentation….

The editors, known collectively as Soundbox, wish to see audio material featured more abundantly and creatively in scholarly settings. At the heart of our collaboration is a bold aspiration to hear sound used as a primary means of knowledge production.”

Their website privileges listening. Hovering one’s cursor over different projects triggers related sound. The range of scholarship and approaches are impressive. Perhaps the challenges of working between media and fields of expertise fostered frequent collaboration. Dancers, composers, ethnomusicologists, curators, sound artists and others worked together to produce different projects. The pieces include “a city symphony of sounds” collected before the 2010 earthquake in Port-Au Prince; recordings from a music studio set up in the Richmond, VA jail; and an audio effects processor, Paperphone, for giving scholars tools to critically ‘sonify’ their presentations.

For Paperphone’s debut at the UCLA, I had agreed to become one of experimenters. Using the MaxLive software plug-in, I performed “Mixtape Rio,” weaving together soundscapes I recorded with my vocal narration. Everyone’s varying uses of the software revealed and opened up new possibilities for scholarly communication and artistic creation.

But, what of credit and evaluation for this kind of scholarship? How does the work register as scholarship and what challenges does it present for the standardized peer-review model of publishing? Support and guidance from well-respected individuals and institutions helps; Duke’s Franklin Humanities Institute and PhD Lab in Digital Knowledge sponsored the initiative. Also, the online iteration of Provoke! Digital Sound Studies will be followed by an edited volume to be published by Duke in Fall 2015. Perhaps, these multiple modes of publishing can work together to strengthen and push the possibilities for scholarship– sonic or otherwise.

Sarah Kendzior @sarahkendzior on “What’s the Point of Academic Publishing?”

In the run up to our meeting on “Publish or perish? The future of academic publishing and careers February 13 – 14, 2014 at UC Davis” I am going to be writing some blog posts about the topics of the meeting.  Just as I started to do a few web searches for one such post – I discovered a very timely article published a few days ago in Vitae: What’s the Point of Academic Publishing?.  The article is by Sarah Kendzior who is a writer who I have interacted with a few times here and there (she writes for Al Jazeera English and writes a lot about Academia).  It is an interesting read.