Category Archives: Speaker Series

Data-Driven Interactive Scientific Articles in a Collaborative Environment With Authorea

Monday, January 23, 2017
12:00NOON – 1:30P.M.
UC Davis, Shields Library,
Data Science Initiative space, 3rd Floor

Lunch served. RSVP here.

Most tools that scientists use for the preparation of scholarly manuscripts, such as Overleaf and ShareLaTex, function offline and do not account for the born-digital nature of research objects. Authorea allows scientists to collaboratively write rich data-driven manuscripts on the web that offers readers a dynamic, interactive experience with an article’s full text, images, interactive figures, data, and code. In this talk, I will show you how Authorea differs from Overleaf and ShareLatex and how we are bringing scientific writing into the 21st century. Please bring your laptop as attendees will be included in the demo (not mandatory but suggested).

Alberto Pepe is the co-founder of Authorea. He recently finished a Postdoctorate in Astrophysics at Harvard University. During his postdoctorate, Alberto was also a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society and the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Alberto is the author of 30 publications in the fields of Information Science, Data Science, Computational Social Science, and Astrophysics. He obtained his Ph.D. in Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles with a dissertation on scientific collaboration networks which was awarded with the Best Dissertation Award by the American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T). Prior to starting his Ph.D., Alberto worked in the Information Technology Department of CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland, where he worked on data repository software and also promoted Open Access among particle physicists. Alberto holds a M.Sc. in Computer Science and a B.Sc. in Astrophysics, both from University College London, U.K. Alberto was born and raised in the wine-making town of Manduria, in Puglia.

David Novak “The Dubbing of a New Era: Audiocassettes, Open Access and the Dissonances of Digital Democracy”

Please join us for a talk by David Novak, Associate Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Barbara
Thursday, May 26, 2016 12-1:30pm, Social Science and Humanities, Room 1246
Lunch will be served. RSVP here
Novak_2016-05-26-a
David Novak is Associate Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Barbara, with affiliations in Anthropology, Film and Media Studies, and East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies. His work deals with the globalization of popular music, remediation, protest culture, and social practices of listening. He is the author of the award-winning Japanoise: Music at the Edge of Circulation (2013) and the co-editor of Keywords in Sound (2015), as well as recent essays and sound recordings in Public Culture, Cultural Anthropology, Popular Music, Sensory Studies, and The Wire. He is the founder of the Music and Sound Interest Group in the American Anthropological Association, and co-director of the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Music.

Co-Sponsored by:
Science and Technology Studies
Innovating Communication in Scholarship
The Center for Science and Innovation Studies

Alessandro Delfanti, “Open Source Cancer: Hacking and Biodigital Rituals of Sharing,” Tues 10/14

Tues, Oct 14, 2014 from 12:10-1:30pm in SSH 1246 of the UC Davis campus.

Please join us in welcoming the new ICIS postdoctoral fellow, Alessandro Delfanti, at a Food for Thought Event. Alessandro will be presenting on his work, Open Source Cancer: Hacking and Biodigital Rituals of Sharing:

Through the website La Cura (the cure), the Italian designer and hacker Salvatore Iaconesi open sourced his brain tumor and mobilized hundreds of thousands of peers through a digital platform. His condition was turned into a global performance of de-medicalization. In order to do this, he had to hack his medical records and convert them into open formats, to make data easily readable and shareable, as well as to construct an inclusive understanding of the word “cure”. With this case I propose the concept of a “biodigital ritual of sharing”, a protocol or script adapted from hacker cultures’ public practices. While in the context of medical institutions data represented an objectification of the body, their reinscription through the ritual helped symbolized the need for a more socialized experience of cancer. Against techno-determinist utopias of distributed innovation, I highlight how open source and crowdsourcing can be seen as dense biopolitical symbols rather than mere distributed technical solutions. I also suggest that, when facing illness and disability, digital cultures imagine and perform technologies as social and relational rather than bodily prosthesis.

Note this is our Food for Thought format where everyone is asked to read a paper ahead of time. After you RSVP, you will be emailed with the paper to be discussed. Please RSVP here to receive a copy of his paper.

This event is co-sponsored with the Center for Science and Innovation Studies & the Science and Technology Studies Program at UC Davis.

Alexandra Lippman, “Tempos and Temporalities of Ownership: Property, Piracy and Public Domain in Funk Carioca,” Tues 10/7

Tues, Oct 7, 2014 from 12:10-1:30pm in SSH 1246 of the UC Davis campus.

Please join us in welcoming the new ICIS postdoctoral fellow, Alexandra Lippman, at a Food for Thought Event. Alexandra will be presenting on her work, Tempos and Temporalities of Ownership: Property, Piracy and Public Domain in Funk Carioca:

Time has long been a concern of anthropologists. In this article, I argue that music has something to add to anthropological understandings of temporality. After all, the organization of time is one of music’s fundamental characteristics. In order to introduce music into anthropological discussions of time, I discuss ownership within funk carioca, a popular Afro-Brazilian musical genre, which relies on sampling, dubbing, and versioning. I identify four different forms ownership and their distinct temporalities within funk carioca. These situations of ownership are a commons, copyrighted, desired for, and pirated. I call their respective temporalities looping time, limited time, imagined futurity, and in-the-meantime. These temporalities are linked, respectively, to an ongoing present, the past, the future, and a heterotemporality. Each mode of ownership presents musicians with unique ways to make money and/or build their reputation. Songs’ circulation through multiple modes of ownership—often simultaneously—further suggests how these modes are coeval rather than mutually exclusive.

Note this is our Food for Thought format where everyone is asked to read a paper ahead of time. After you RSVP, you will be emailed with the paper to be discussed. Please RSVP here to receive a copy of her paper.

This event is co-sponsored with the Center for Science and Innovation Studies & the Science and Technology Studies Program at UC Davis.