Category Archives: News stories of interest

Virtual Itineraries Through the Speculum Romanae

Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae, A125, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.
Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae, A125, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

The University of Chicago Library takes a cue from nearly 500 year old publishing practices  to curate personalized, “individually bound” introductions to their digital collection of the Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae:

In 1540 Antonio Lafreri, a native of Besançon transplanted to Rome, began publishing maps and other printed images that depicted major monuments and antiquities in Rome. These images were calculated to appeal to the taste for classical antiquity that fueled the cultural event we call the Renaissance. After Lafreri published a title page in the mid-1570s, collections of these prints came to be known as the Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae, the “Mirror of Roman Magnificence.” Tourists and other collectors who bought prints from Lafreri made their own selections and had them individually bound. Over time, Lafreri’s title page served as starting point for large and eclectic compilations, expanded and rearranged by generations of collectors.

Continue reading Virtual Itineraries Through the Speculum Romanae

Sarah Kendzior @sarahkendzior on “What’s the Point of Academic Publishing?”

In the run up to our meeting on “Publish or perish? The future of academic publishing and careers February 13 – 14, 2014 at UC Davis” I am going to be writing some blog posts about the topics of the meeting.  Just as I started to do a few web searches for one such post – I discovered a very timely article published a few days ago in Vitae: What’s the Point of Academic Publishing?.  The article is by Sarah Kendzior who is a writer who I have interacted with a few times here and there (she writes for Al Jazeera English and writes a lot about Academia).  It is an interesting read.

Tenure policies not keeping up with the digital revolution

Interesting article in the Chronicle for Higher Education that I was pointed to by Mackenzie Smith:

Digital Humanists: If You Want Tenure, Do Double the Work | Vitae.

The article is by Sydni Dunn – a Staff Reporter at CUE and it discusses a topic of direct relevance the upcoming conference we are hosting here: Publish or perish? The future of academic publishing and careers February 13 – 14, 2013 UC Davis.  The article focuses on some discussions that came up in association with the annual meeting of the MLA – the Modern Language Association.  The discussion was about how to assess scholars in the humanities – especially those who are heavy on the digital side of scholarship.  And the discussion is both scary (to me at least) and fascinating as scholars struggle with how to get their institutions to accept digital scholarship and assess it.

It is definitely worth a read and I note we will have extensive discussions of this general topic at our meeting …