Category Archives: Uncategorized

Data-Driven Interactive Scientific Articles in a Collaborative Environment With Authorea

Monday, January 23, 2017
12:00NOON – 1:30P.M.
UC Davis, Shields Library,
Data Science Initiative space, 3rd Floor

Lunch served. RSVP here.

Most tools that scientists use for the preparation of scholarly manuscripts, such as Overleaf and ShareLaTex, function offline and do not account for the born-digital nature of research objects. Authorea allows scientists to collaboratively write rich data-driven manuscripts on the web that offers readers a dynamic, interactive experience with an article’s full text, images, interactive figures, data, and code. In this talk, I will show you how Authorea differs from Overleaf and ShareLatex and how we are bringing scientific writing into the 21st century. Please bring your laptop as attendees will be included in the demo (not mandatory but suggested).

Alberto Pepe is the co-founder of Authorea. He recently finished a Postdoctorate in Astrophysics at Harvard University. During his postdoctorate, Alberto was also a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society and the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Alberto is the author of 30 publications in the fields of Information Science, Data Science, Computational Social Science, and Astrophysics. He obtained his Ph.D. in Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles with a dissertation on scientific collaboration networks which was awarded with the Best Dissertation Award by the American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T). Prior to starting his Ph.D., Alberto worked in the Information Technology Department of CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland, where he worked on data repository software and also promoted Open Access among particle physicists. Alberto holds a M.Sc. in Computer Science and a B.Sc. in Astrophysics, both from University College London, U.K. Alberto was born and raised in the wine-making town of Manduria, in Puglia.

Authorship and the Promises of Digital Dissemination

authorship_2016-03-09AUTHORSHIP AND THE PROMISES OF DIGITAL DISSEMINATION
March 9, 4:00- 5:45 pm
UC Davis School of Law, King Hall, Rm 2100A

A cross-disciplinary panel discussion on authorship in the digital age, with a focus on the specific goals and needs of academic authors. Authors who write to be read care about how their works are published and what that means for reader access. While traditional options and copyright arrangements still predominate in many fields, there are ever-increasing ways to share works of authorship. What works best to get textual and visual works out there and under what circumstances? Join us for this panel discussion with Authors Alliance, where we will explore the opportunities and challenges authors face in maximizing the reach of their work, both in and outside of academia.

Participants:
Mario Biagioli (Law, STS)
Stephanie Boluk (English)
Jonathan Eisen (Biology)
Alexandra Lippman (STS)
Rick Prelinger (UCSC and director of the Prelinger Archive)
Kim Stanley Robinson (Mars Trilogy)
Pam Samuelson (Authors Alliance)
MacKenzie Smith (Library)
Madhavi Sunder (Law)
Michael Wolfe (Authors Alliance)

Co-Sponsors:
Davis Humanities Institute
Institute for the Social Sciences
Authors Alliance
Center for Science and Innovation Studies
Innovating Communication in Scholarship Project
UC Davis School of Law

Join the ICIS Announcements Listserv!

New ICIS-sponsored events are on their way for the upcoming year! Details about these events will be announced through our mailing list which you can join in one of two ways:


1. If you have a UC Davis email account, please go to https://lists.ucdavis.edu/sympa/info/icis to subscribe. OR


2. If you do not have a UC Davis email account, then please send an email to afelfanti@ucdavis.edu, alippman@ucdavis.edu, or aefish@ucdavis.edu and we will add you by hand.


The list will be used only for announces related to ICIS events, and you will be free to unsubscribe at any time.

The UC Open Access Policy & what it means for you (UC Davis Library 10/22)

WED. OCTOBER 22nd from 1:30-3PM

Panel organized by the Library at UC Davis

The UC Open Access Policy (http://osc.universityofcalifornia.edu/open-access-policy/ or http://uc-oa.info) was passed by the UC Academic Senate on July 24, 2013, and is going into effect for all UC campuses, including UC Davis, on November 1, 2014. The policy grants UC faculty the right to make their articles freely available to the public by depositing a pre-publication copy in an open access repository. What does this policy mean for faculty at UC Davis?

Come to this talk by Catherine Mitchell of the California Digital Library (CDL), who will describe the tools and services that CDL is developing to support the policy, and Dr. Robert Powell of Chemical Engineering, who will give background on the policy and its passage through the UC Senate.  Afterwards a Q&A panel will be held with the speakers, UC Davis librarians and open access researchers to answer questions and discuss the implications of the policy and open access.

This talk is being held during Open Access Week 2014, an annual international event to raise awareness about open access issues.

  • Catherine Mitchell and Dr. Robert Powell on the UC OA policy: talk and discussion
  • Wednesday, October 22, 2014
  • Shields Library, Nelle Branch Room, 2nd floor (at the far end of the main reading room)
  • 1:30-3:00pm

Questions? Contact Phoebe Ayers, psayers@ucdavis.edu

New article on altmetrics from Anup Kumar Das & Sanjaya Mishra

New article on genesis of altmetrics for measuring efficacy of scholarly communication by Anup Kumar Das (JNU, India) and Sanjaya Mishra (CEMCA, India).

Pre-print available at http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1408/1408.0090.pdf

The article by New Delhi-based scholars Das and Mishra gives a brief review of the existing literature on altmetrics. Among other things, the article provides a history of altmetrics approaches/mechanisms for multi-dimensional  assessment of article/manuscript impact. Kumar and Mishra also geographically map the current state of altmetrics activity and research – making the point that there is an almost complete lack in the developing world. This begs the question of how altmetric literacies might be cultivated in and tailored to the needs of these varied research communities?